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Cyber Saturday

If you're out hitting the mall, or better yet hitting the flaming keyboard on Cyber Saturday, how about considering my books? They make wonderful gifts!

So your husband liked the Stargate books and sneakily read your copies. How about giving him his very own copy of Lost Things? In 1929 archeologists began draining Lake Nemi in search of the mysterious ships that have been glimpsed beneath its waters since the reign of Claudius. What they awakened had been drowned for two thousand years. For a very good reason. Veteran aviator Lewis Segura has been drifting since the Great War ended, fetched up at last at the small company run by fellow veterans and pilots Alma Gilchrist and Mitchell Sorley, assisted by their old friend Dr. Jerry Ballard, an archeologist who lost his career when he lost part of his leg. It’s a living, and if it’s not quite what any of them had dreamed of, it’s better than much that they’ve already survived. But Lewis has always dreamed true, and what he sees in his dreams will take them on a dangerous chase from Hollywood to New York to an airship over the Atlantic, and finally to the Groves of Diana Herself…. For the reader who likes Raiders of the Lost Ark and will enjoy exciting period adventure!

Your mom loved The Mists of Avalon, didn't she? Or maybe it was your aunt or your big sister. How about Black Ships? It's a retelling of the Aeneid from the point of view of the oracle who travels with Aeneas as he journeys to save his people and find his destiny. Black Ships was one of Locus' nominees for best new books of 2008. Just as Marion Zimmer Bradley's The Mists of Avalon breathed new life into Arthurian legend, BLACK SHIPS evokes the world of ancient Greece with beautiful, haunting prose, extraordinary imagination, and a profoundly moving story. For the reader who loves classic, sweeping fantasy with a female protagonist.

Your friend was into Stargate Atlantis and was so disappointed that the series ended where it did. Homecoming is the answer! This is the first book of the Legacy series, the "sixth season" in print. Atlantis has returned to Earth. The team members have dispersed and are beginning new lives far from the dangers of the Pegasus galaxy. They think the adventure is over. They're wrong. For the reader who loved Stargate Atlantis but hasn't taken the plunge into the books, Homecoming won't disappoint.

She likes erotica, but she doesn't read romance because she thinks there's not enough meat to it. She likes historicals, but she's tired of Regencies where the main character is always innocent and put upon. She wishes someone would write Master and Commander with some women in it. Boy, she's hard to buy for, your wife/best friend/sister/lover/daughter! How about my newest book, The General's Mistress? As a spirit of change overturns Europe’s old order, strong-willed Elzelina Versfelt enters her own age of revolution. Married as a romantic young girl to a man who wanted only her money, but neither loves nor desires her, Elza refuses to be chained any longer. Leaving Amsterdam, her marriage, and her home, she flees to France—where the old rules no longer apply, debauchery is not a sin . . . and nothing is forbidden. Yet Elza finds herself bound in a new way, to the ambitious General Moreau. And while they share pleasure, pain, and carnal adventures, she dreams of another man, an unruly red-haired soldier she first saw in the promise of a Tarot card. Drawn by this half-real, half-imagined hero, Elza defies her relationship with Moreau, and begins a perilous search across war-torn Europe. But will this woman with the instincts of a survivor, the passion of a courtesan, and the gift of second sight ever find the destiny for which she has risked it all? This stunning novel blends history with the language of the heart to tell a sensual story of an era of upheaval . . . and of the clamoring, dangerous desires of a woman’s soul. For readers who like historical fiction and want something daring, dashing and sexy!

Comments

( 14 comments — Leave a comment )
hiveshipmist
Nov. 25th, 2012 06:28 pm (UTC)
I'm going to give Black Ships a try. I read the Aeneid back in high school and think I will enjoy the perspective of a historical female voice. :)
jo_graham
Nov. 25th, 2012 07:38 pm (UTC)
You could! I think you might like it!

(Also, it's kind of true that Wind in Secrets is a Wraith Xandros from Black Ships....)
hiveshipmist
Nov. 25th, 2012 07:47 pm (UTC)
Bought it on Kindle. :) When the description says Numinous Worlds 1, does that mean there are sequels with these same characters or is it referring to your line of historical novels in general?

I'll keep an eye out for Xandros then! :D
jo_graham
Nov. 25th, 2012 08:22 pm (UTC)
My historical fantasies are set in the same world, the Numinous World, and the same characters go through the different books reincarnated. The main character of each book is the same "person" only as different people, if that makes sense? But because they're stand alone in different eras, you can read them in any order and they work by themselves.
hiveshipmist
Nov. 27th, 2012 12:36 am (UTC)
This is helpful, thanks. :) I probably won't be able to catch who reincarnates as who in each book, but I have noticed strong color themes already in Black Ships. For Gull: red, black, and white. The colors are there in the flags of Gull's vision at the beginning, and flashes of them appear constantly in her day-to-day life in the forms of black hoods, red hair, and alabaster containers, for example. For Pythia: blue. Blue flames, blue veins, blue eyes.

Edited at 2012-11-27 12:45 am (UTC)
jo_graham
Nov. 27th, 2012 01:35 pm (UTC)
Oh yes! That's very deliberate! Red, white and black, the colors of Mystery -- life and death and the blood that unites them. They run all the way through. Nobody had ever mentioned noticing that before! :)
hiveshipmist
Nov. 27th, 2012 01:54 pm (UTC)
Good, I'm glad I am not repeating anything you might have said about the book in previous entries and was hoping you would say what their meanings were.

I also noticed Gull has the same spirit of Osprey and Teyla, put upon to become leaders by circumstance, but they rise to the occasion and also shape their own destinies. Is there a historical motif of how both Gull and Teyla touch someone when their hands have been bloodied? The image seems as plausibly historically real and symbolic as the young Queen in "The Accolade," knighting a young man with the touch of a sword on the shoulder.
jo_graham
Nov. 27th, 2012 02:03 pm (UTC)
The meanings -- white and black for life and death, which is pretty straightforward, and red for the blood. The bloodied hands, and bloodied clothes, come up in the battle scenes and in the birth scenes. I don't know if you've gotten there yet, but when Gull delivers Tia's baby she goes out to tell Tia's brother that she's fine, he blanches because there's red blood all down her dress. The gates of life are like the gates of death, blood paying the price for new life. One of the things Gull is learning, one of the Mysteries, is that Death requires birth, and that both gates are mirrors of the other. That's why the birth scenes and the death scenes get equal weight. Usually there aren't any birth scenes!

I'm actually not sure where I got the bloodied hands image from first! I remember thinking it was very old -- that the red ochre hands in cave paintings look like bloody handprints, and I wondered if that's what they were supposed to be, like burying the bodies with red ochre sprinkled over them. You probably haven't gotten to the Neanderthal bones in the cave part yet, but that was one thing I was thinking of, about the burial of a nine year old Neanderthal boy who had died in an accident, buried with red ochre and a toy spear and a wealth of summer wildflowers. The pollen analysis showed that he was completely covered with summer flowers, the grave heaped with them. Not so very different, though so long ago.
hiveshipmist
Nov. 28th, 2012 04:22 pm (UTC)
I'm not at the birth scene yet, but have seen Gull set aside the old tradition of not seeing blood being shed a few times. In order to fully understand Death and give the best advice to others, I would think she would have to see both birth and death from war.

My Kindle edition came with some book club type questions for thought in an appendix which I will have fun with and I will go back and read your entries here on the book too, so you might see comments from me on some very old posts.
jo_graham
Nov. 29th, 2012 08:21 pm (UTC)
I think she would have to see both too, that truly serving the Mystery she serves would require a larger perspective, not a more sequestered one. Which is a change that can be made with movement, if that follows?

The book club questions are pretty good, I think. And please post away! I'm happy to talk on older posts anytime.
hiveshipmist
Dec. 7th, 2012 09:43 pm (UTC)
I finished Black Ships and don't have anything to add to the older posts, but wanted to comment one of my favorite aspects of the setting is how the different religious scholars welcomed one another, in both teaching and learning. "The is also my face" was one of my favorite lines. The writing made me feel like I could have been there with Gull, so many generations ago, fully immersed in all those different cultures and climate zones.
jo_graham
Dec. 11th, 2012 06:52 pm (UTC)
Oh thank you! (I'm sorry it's taken me so long to respond. I've had bronchitis this week and I'm just getting up and around.) That's what I'd hoped it would feel like -- like taking a journey to a different world that is kind of like ours....
m_nivalis
Nov. 28th, 2012 04:22 pm (UTC)
You might have seen this already, but John Scalzi will do a shopping guide promotion post the first week in December, and if you re-post this on his blog on the appropriate day it might get you some more readers.
jo_graham
Nov. 29th, 2012 08:21 pm (UTC)
Oh that is a good thing to know! Thank you!
( 14 comments — Leave a comment )